Why do campers/caravans have flexi waste pipes?

mrmoosehead

Active Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2020
Location
Ilkley, West Yorkshire
They seem like a terrible idea for stuff getting stuck, flow issues etc.
I think I might do mine in 1" solvent weld. I would use 32mm standard waste, but that will possibly be too high to fit under the floor boards.
Also, the place it goes through the floorpan should be easier to get an accurate and well sealed hole with solid pipe, right?

Any reasons I should not do it in solvent weld smooth pipe?
 

david.c.hall

Active Member
Joined
May 16, 2016
Location
Irnham, South Lincolnshire
You can get smooth bore flexible. Used a lot for pond pumps and filters.
The main reason it is used , I think, is that van conversions tend to be short of space and it's easy to fit round things.
The bigger Motorhomes US sized etc just use domestic waste.
David
 

mrmoosehead

Active Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2020
Location
Ilkley, West Yorkshire
Ah - I have some 40mm ID smooth bore flexi pipe for the somewhat oversized garden feature that I made a couple of years back. I was only ever going to do one, so I made it big :D

Might consider that stuff.
 

jjturner

Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2016
I used smoothbore flexi pipe, but have thought about wider straight pipe if I do another.
Flexi pipes really do help with fitting round things though.
 

BigAldo

New Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2020
I used standard domestic waste pipes. A combination of 40 and 32 mm. Used a shallow shower trap under the sink, then a reducer to 32mm. I preferred compression joints to allow a little flexibility to compensate for vibration in the van. I thought welds might be too brittle and split.
 

mrmoosehead

Active Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2020
Location
Ilkley, West Yorkshire
I used standard domestic waste pipes. A combination of 40 and 32 mm. Used a shallow shower trap under the sink, then a reducer to 32mm. I preferred compression joints to allow a little flexibility to compensate for vibration in the van. I thought welds might be too brittle and split.
A properly solvent welded joint should be stronger than the pipework. However the key word here is "properly" :)
 

david.c.hall

Active Member
Joined
May 16, 2016
Location
Irnham, South Lincolnshire
The problem with solvent weld is that it's a pain, when in a couple of years time, you think 'Now perhaps if I changed this' and you have to start cutting pipes to move them instead of just undoing them.
Although I suppose some don't tinker all the time?
David
 
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